Bi-Polar vs Schizo-Affective Disorder

Schizophrenia is commonly mis-diagnosed as bi-polar disorder. The closest most accurate diagnosis is schizo-affective disorder, described as an irregular type of schizophrenia by psychiatrists. In this disorder, characteristics of schizophrenia are combined with the mood swings of bi-polar. Patients with this disease should be advised to watch for depressive episodes and the risk of suicide. We were not advised. The famous Amen Clinic prides itself on its accurate diagnoses, but fails to give any practical advice on how this diagnosis differs from regular schizophrenia. Antipsychotic drug treatment is the first line of treatment given for both diseases.

Schizoaffective Disorder

Like other psychotic disorders, schizoaffective disorder can be a difficult diagnosis to determine. The patient must meet all the criteria for schizophrenia and have significant mood symptoms. It must then be determined that the mood symptoms are not causing the psychotic symptoms. To do this the doctor takes a careful history to know whether there have been psychotic symptoms even when there have been no mood symptoms.

Bi-Polar Disorder Misunderstood as Schizophrenia

Bipolar disorder is often confused with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, but it is not the same illness. It is a mood disorder characterized by manic, depressed, or mixed mood states. Symptoms of mania include an elevated or irritable mood, grandiosity, decreased need for sleep, racing thoughts, distractibility, agitation, poor impulse control, and pressured speech. Depressive symptoms include a sad mood, guilty feelings, poor appetite, and weight change. A mixed state has characteristics of both manic and depressed states at the same time.

The difference between bipolar disorder and schizoaffective disorder is that in bipolar disorder the mood is the predominant symptom, and it is cyclical in nature. When the mood symptoms remit, the patient returns to normal functioning. In schizoaffective disorder, the mood symptoms may clear, but other symptoms persist.

Schizophrenia

The symptoms used to diagnose schizophrenia were described to me by Dr. Jose Mackliff, an Ecuadorian psychiatrist and scientist who was the Director of the Schizophrenia Ward at Luis Vernaza Hospital for thirteen years and developed BEAM Procedure for schizophrenia. For thirteen years, he observed the suffering of his patients, knowing that the antipsychotics couldn’t help them and only kept them sedated. Instead of becoming depressed, he became excited about the metabolism behind schizophrenia.

At the beginning of the disease, there is isolation, loss of student activity, deterioration of personal hygiene, and strange ideas that manifest in the person. In the middle of the process, strange, delusional ideas; ideas of greatness; religious ideas without content of persecution; persecutory ideas; auditory hallucinations of more than two words not related to depression; loss of thought association and poverty of content; magic thoughts; clairvoyance; telepathy; inappropriate emotions; and disorganized behavior. If a patient has any of these symptoms during the stages of the disease, it is schizophrenia.

Schizophrenia as a Functional Disorder

This description came from interviews with Dr. Mackliff and is based on observations he made in his patients before and after they had the BEAM (bilateral electro-coagulation of adrenal medulla) surgery. He describes schizophrenia as beginning in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis:

The axis is formed by three hormones: glucagon, cortisol and adrenaline, but in the schizophrenic patient adrenaline is failing to arrive in the axis, and this develops metabolic problems, energy problems inside the neuron. In other words, a series of factors causing intra-cerebral communication disorders between the thalamus and the cortex, and this is the schizophrenic process. Dr. Mackliff hypothesized that too much adrenaline is produced in schizophrenics. The brain therefore blocks the entry of blood adrenaline into the HPTA axis. Dr. Mackliff saw that by eliminating the hormone adrenaline from its source, the adrenal medulla glands, the brain would compensate by producing nor-adrenaline. This source of adrenaline goes directly into the HPTA axis, restoring the right amount of cerebral dopamine in the limbic region of the brain.

In the brain, dopamine functions as a neurotransmitter—a chemical released by nerve cells to send signals to other nerve cells. The brain includes several distinct dopamine systems, one of which plays a major role in reward-motivated behavior. Most types of reward increase the level of dopamine in the brain, and a variety of addictive drugs increase dopamine neuronal activity. Other brain dopamine systems are involved in motor control and in controlling the release of several other important hormones. Schizophrenia is a result of an excessive amount of dopamine in the limbic region of the brain.

Is BEAM Procedure a Cure for Schizophrenia?

Dr. Jose R. Mackliff, patented owner of BEAM Procedure

The BEAM Procedure, developed by Dr. Jose R. Mackliff, Ecuadorian psychiatrist and researcher, is a surgery done on the adrenal medulla glands which has been successfully done on 140 people with schizophrenia from one to 22 years since 2006.

BEAM or bi-lateral electro-coagulation of adrenal medulla eliminates the symptoms of schizophrenia by balancing the hormones in the Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Thyroid-Adrenal (HPTA) axis in the brain stem, causing the brain to regulate cerebral dopamine. Schizophrenia is a disease caused by a disruption in the gluco-regulatory system, resulting in unregulated cerebral dopamine.

Dr. Mackliff developed BEAM over 30 years of self-funded research. He was the schizophrenic ward director at Sala San Jose at Lorenzo Ponce Hospital from 1973 to 1986. It was there that he watched his patients for 13 years who never improved and became more apathetic and stressed with additional chronic diseases with each year. The notorious failure of antipsychotic drugs to relieve, even temporarily, the symptoms of schizophrenia motivated him to study the various autonomic questions that arose about the metabolism behind this disease.

Why isn’t BEAM Procedure Known Throughout the World?

BEAM has been presented at three international neuroscience conferences, World Congress of BITs Neurotalk, in 2011, 2015 and again in May 2018. Although recognized as a radically new and promising treatment for schizophrenia, it has not yet been recommended for formalized research funded by international health agencies.

Because the need for antipsychotic drugs is reduced and eventually eliminated after BEAM surgery, BEAM will never be recommended for further research by psychiatric associations around the world, nor by the drug companies that exploit and profit from the vulnerability of people with schizophrenia.

Patients and their families come to BEAM after hearing the testimonials of those who have been cured of schizophrenia after having the BEAM surgery.

It is only the patients and families who have been cured of schizophrenia from the BEAM surgery who can organize and gain force to make the BEAM Procedure known to their medical communities.

It seems it is not Dr. Mackliff’s role to make his treatment known and accepted by the scientific communities around the world in his lifetime.

Blog’s Author

The author of this blog is Suzanne Ayer Patterson, the mother of a 20-year-old boy who was diagnosed with schizo-affective disorder in 2013 and took his life in 2014 after being put on a high dosage of Seroquel, an antipsychotic, for one year by a respected psychiatrist in Marin County. Later, Suzanne would find out that this doctor had been receiving payments for prescribing Seroquel from the drug manufacturer for more than ten years. This is common practice in psychiatry in the United States.

As a way to direct the anguish and suffering from her son’s tragic death, Suzanne began to research schizophrenia, its treatment and the BEAM Procedure for schizophrenia which she had heard about while her son was still alive. She worked actively to make this information and the BEAM surgery known to families around the world with children with schizophrenia. A book co-authored by Dr. Mackliff, a blog and website, and a documentary film resulted from three and 1/2 years of diligent efforts.

This worthwhile work directly resulted in two young American men, age 17 and 28, having the BEAM surgery in Ecuador in January of 2018. They both are now cured of schizophrenia, just three months later, and take no antipsychotic medication. Testimonials from the mothers and a video two days after surgery for one of the boys, can be viewed on schizophreniasolution.org.

People seeking an understanding of BEAM and how it works should read my book, A Life Worth Living – Schizophrenia Alternative Treatment and watch my documentary film,
A Life Worth Living – Solution to Schizophrenia.  Additional scientific knowledge and case studies can be read in Dr. Mackliff’s medical book in English, Schizophrenia and Parkinson Surgery available on Amazon. Visit the BEAM Procedure website: beamprocedure.com

You may also contact Dr. Mackliff in English directly by email drmackliff@beamprocedure.com.

 

 

Bi-polar Disorder Vs Schizophrenia

Schizophrenia is commonly mis-diagnosed as bi-polar disorder. The closest most accurate diagnosis is schizo-affective disorder, described as an irregular type of schizophrenia by psychiatrists. In this disorder, characteristics of schizophrenia are combined with the mood swings of bi-polar. Patients with this disease should be advised to watch for depressive episodes and the risk of suicide. We were not advised. The famous Amen Clinic prides itself on its accurate diagnoses, but fails to give any practical advice on how this diagnosis differs from regular schizophrenia. Antipsychotic drug treatment is the first line of treatment given for both diseases.

Schizoaffective Disorder

Like other psychotic disorders, schizoaffective disorder can be a difficult diagnosis to determine. The patient must meet all the criteria for schizophrenia and have significant mood symptoms. It must then be determined that the mood symptoms are not causing the psychotic symptoms. To do this the doctor takes a careful history to know whether there have been psychotic symptoms even when there have been no mood symptoms.

Bi-Polar Disorder Misunderstood as Schizophrenia

Bipolar disorder is often confused with schizophrenia or schizoaffective disorder, but it is not the same illness. It is a mood disorder characterized by manic, depressed, or mixed mood states. Symptoms of mania include an elevated or irritable mood, grandiosity, decreased need for sleep, racing thoughts, distractibility, agitation, poor impulse control, and pressured speech. Depressive symptoms include a sad mood, guilty feelings, poor appetite, and weight change. A mixed state has characteristics of both manic and depressed states at the same time.

The difference between bipolar disorder and schizoaffective disorder is that in bipolar disorder the mood is the predominant symptom, and it is cyclical in nature. When the mood symptoms remit, the patient returns to normal functioning. In schizoaffective disorder, the mood symptoms may clear, but other symptoms persist.

Schizophrenia

The symptoms used to diagnose schizophrenia were described to me by Dr. Jose Mackliff, an Ecuadorian psychiatrist and scientist who was the Director of the Schizophrenia Ward at Luis Vernaza Hospital for thirteen years and developed BEAM Procedure for schizophrenia. For thirteen years, he observed the suffering of his patients, knowing that the antipsychotics couldn’t help them and only kept them sedated. Instead of becoming depressed, he became excited about the metabolism behind schizophrenia.

At the beginning of the disease, there is isolation, loss of student activity, deterioration of personal hygiene, and strange ideas that manifest in the person. In the middle of the process, strange, delusional ideas; ideas of greatness; religious ideas without content of persecution; persecutory ideas; auditory hallucinations of more than two words not related to depression; loss of thought association and poverty of content; magic thoughts; clairvoyance; telepathy; inappropriate emotions; and disorganized behavior. If a patient has any of these symptoms during the stages of the disease, it is schizophrenia.

Schizophrenia as a Functional Disorder

This description came from interviews with Dr. Mackliff and is based on observations he made in his patients before and after they had the BEAM (bilateral electro-coagulation of adrenal medulla) surgery. He describes schizophrenia as beginning in the hypothalamus-pituitary-thyroid axis:

The axis is formed by three hormones: glucagon, cortisol and adrenaline, but in the schizophrenic patient adrenaline is failing to arrive in the axis, and this develops metabolic problems, energy problems inside the neuron. In other words, a series of factors causing intra-cerebral communication disorders between the thalamus and the cortex, and this is the schizophrenic process. Dr. Mackliff hypothesized that too much adrenaline is produced in schizophrenics. The brain therefore blocks the entry of blood adrenaline into the HPTA axis. Dr. Mackliff saw that by eliminating the hormone adrenaline from its source, the adrenal medulla glands, the brain would compensate by producing nor-adrenaline. This source of adrenaline goes directly into the HPTA axis, restoring the right amount of cerebral dopamine in the limbic region of the brain.

In the brain, dopamine functions as a neurotransmitter—a chemical released by nerve cells to send signals to other nerve cells. The brain includes several distinct dopamine systems, one of which plays a major role in reward-motivated behavior. Most types of reward increase the level of dopamine in the brain, and a variety of addictive drugs increase dopamine neuronal activity. Other brain dopamine systems are involved in motor control and in controlling the release of several other important hormones. Schizophrenia is a result of an excessive amount of dopamine in the limbic region of the brain.